Two White Girls on a Mini Bus





Have Your Fare Ready: Make sure you have your correct fare ready before boarding the bus or taxi. There is a possible that it fell out your pocket before entering the bus. Try to use Jamaican currency when visiting Coach Hire Buntingford Jamaica. American currency makes you look like a novice. Ask the driver the fare before boarding. Try to have the exact change, if possible.

Charter a Taxi Sometimes: If your journey is time sensitive or you have too many luggages its best to hire a chartered taxi. Make sure the vehicle is license to do charters. Agree on the fare before moving. Veteran tourists have enough experience to take unlicensed taxi's. Not recommended for first time visitors to Jamaica.

Be Aware of Your Environment: Interact with the people in the bus park. Don't be afraid of asking those at the Bus Park or bus stop about recommending a driver. Also watch and see who your driver is talking to (does he seem popular).

Travel Light and Prepared: Try to wear a back pack and have your hands free. Have snacks ready for long journeys.

How to Dress: Dressing like a hippie will make you look very cool, especially if you have dreadlocks. Try to look as natural and laid back as possible. Get ready to face very humid and hot conditions on the bus. There are a few large buses owned by the government that does have AC, but they are really slow but comfortable.

________________________________________________________________

Transportation from Narita Airport to Tokyo

Local Trains Are Convenient for TravelArriving in Japan, especially after a long flight, can seem like a confusing and difficult task, given the language barrier and culture shock some visitors may experience. Narita International Airport has several fast and convenient options for travel to Japan's capital city, Tokyo. With frequent airport departure and arrival times, even short stopovers in Tokyo are possible.

Options for Traveling to Tokyo by Train

Traveling between Narita International Airport and central Tokyo by train can be an affordable and simple option for visitors. With several trains to choose from, the rail systems that service Narita International Airport provide the fastest journey time to Tokyo by avoiding heavy traffic at peak times.

Aside from the JR Sobu Line train which is a regular commuter train serving many stations between Tokyo and Narita Airport, there are dedicated airport trains that make arriving in Tokyo easy. It should be noted however, that most subway stations to not have ramps or porters for luggage transportation, and connections around Tokyo via the metro can be difficult, especially at peak times. Consider using a takuhaibin or luggage delivery service to delivery bags to any location across Japan within 24 hours.

The Keisei Skyliner

Ideal for those staying in the Ueno area of downtown Herts Executive Tokyo, the Keisei Skyliner provides direct service from Narita Airport. With one stop at Nippori Station, the Keisei Skyliner has room for luggage, reserved seats, and allows for easy metro connections or taxi hire at Ueno Station. At 1920 Yen per ride, the Keisei Skyliner takes approximately 53 minutes from the airport to Ueno, and departs every 40 minutes. Ticket counters are located in the arrival lobby in Terminal 1 and 2.

The Keisei Limited Express

Similar to the Keisei Skyliner, this train runs the same route but is a regular commuter train without reserved seats. This train can be crowded at peak travel times and does not have room for oversize luggage. At only 1000 Yen per ride it is the cheapest way to get to Tokyo. This train runs approximately every 20 minutes, with a travel time of approximately 75 minutes to Ueno Station.

The JR Narita Express or N'EX

The JR Narita Express train serves Tokyo, Ikebukuro, Shibuya, Shinagawa, Shinjuku, Yokohama, and Takao Stations, in addition to others. When purchasing a ticket, specify which station you are traveling to as the train splits in two directions once in the greater Tokyo area. Tickets for the N'EX can be purchased at the JR Ticket Reservation Office or any of the automated ticket machines at the airport.

The N'EX offers a handy package that includes a re-loadable Suica "smart card" for use on most subways, buses, and railways. This plastic card is effectively a debit card from which pre-loaded amounts can be used towards payment of goods including public transportation. The Suica card comes pre-loaded with 2000 Yen for use on most railways, subways, and buses in Tokyo and is an accepted form of payment at some convenience stores and restaurants. The N'EX and Suica package are an ideal choice for visitors spending a few days in Tokyo, and is priced from 3500 to 5000 Yen on depending on the class of ticket on the N'EX train.

Taking the Bus from Narita Airport

The Airport Limousine Bus operates to and from the airport and Tokyo's major hotels. For travelers staying at one of the hotels the bus serves or nearby the hotel location, this option provides the cheapest mode of door-to-door travel and luggage service. Dependent on traffic, the ride takes approximately 70 to 90 minutes, and departs every hour between 7:30 and 21:00. Tickets cost 3,000 Yen per ride and include one free day pass for the Tokyo Metro, making connections to other locations simple.

The Airport Limousine Bus has service counters located in the arrival lobby of both Terminal 1 and Terminal 2.

Taking a Taxi from Narita Airport

The least recommended option for travel from Narita to central Tokyo is by taxi. Dependent on traffic, the ride from Narita to Tokyo can take approximately 70 minutes or more, and cost upwards of 20,000 Yen (approximately $200 CDN). All taxis are metered so the charge will fluctuate based on route and traffic conditions. Taxis are located outside the terminal doors and have signs clearly marking the ride queue. Taking a taxi affords the luxury of door-to-door service and a convenient way to travel with luggage.



With multiple options for travel, getting to central Tokyo from Narita International Airport can be simple and affordable, while making the return journey to the airport just as smooth.

A Business Model That Keeps on Giving



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If there were an Entrepreneur's Hall of Fame, Wayne Huizenga would be a charter member. Most people recognize the Wayne Huizenga as being the former owner of the Florida Marlins baseball team, and the current owner of the National Football League's Miami Dolphins. These are the types of gaudy baubles a billionaire entrepreneur collects. However, his success came from the most elemental business: trash hauling.

Mr. Huizenga started as a small time cartage operator for a waste disposal firm in south Florida. He worked his way into sales and ultimately bought a small firm. In the 1960's waste disposal was a local, independent, mom and pop type of business in the United States as well as in most industrialized countries. There was no scale. Each trash removal firm worked on contracts negotiated with local governments. There was always the fear of political winds changing and effecting a contractors future status.



From his perspective as a small time operator in a highly fragmented industry, Wayne Huizenga knew that he needed a safety net, not wanting to be tied to a sole municipality for his firm's sustenance. His idea was elegantly simple: he would build a national firm, with appropriate leverage and economies of scale, by buying up key independent garbage hauling firms in strategically important markets. This would provide the strength to expand in every secondary market and standardize this formerly sclerotic industry.

This idea evolved into Waste Management. Mr. Huizenga became a billionaire when his firm, after ascending to the number one spot as an international garbage-hauling firm, with contracts spanning the United States, Europe and Asia, was listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The simple idea of consolidating hundreds of independent firms under one roof and standardizing the service menu was a thoroughly disruptive new business model. Former owners for these independent businesses were induced to sell by offers of stock, options and management contracts.

With a billion dollars in hand, Mr. Huizenga could have retired and collected art, cars, coins or stamps. He could have hung out with the idle rich. Instead, he applied the business model that created Waste Management to a completely different business category: home entertainment. In the 1970's, with the market introduction of first beat-max, and subsequently VHS technology, and then the rapid descent of retail pricing for home video players, thousands of independent retail stores popped up offering video for rent. The ability to rent a popular movie tape and play it when desired in the comfort of one's home, was a huge change in behavior and the method of delivering entertainment to the masses.

Wayne Huizenga was restless, looking for a new challenge and open to any opportunity that offered huge potential upside rewards. He saw it in a small, but growing firm: Blockbuster Video. Today, the consumer recognizes the Blockbuster brand as a generic term for home entertainment. 25 years ago, Blockbuster was one of a handful of movie rental chains, several sold franchises, all were regional, struggling for capital to fund expansion, and competing against locally owned stores. The same fragmented industry distribution channels that existed in the garbage removal business were immediately obvious to Wayne Huizenga. He pounced.

After purchasing Blockbuster Video, Mr. Huizenga began the same type of assimilation program he pursued with Waste Management. Small, local video rental chains were purchased. The Company was listed on the New York Stock Exchange and the funds raised fueled a rapid expansion. The leverage and muscle that Blockbuster gained was utilized in purchasing product from the major Hollywood studios at more favorable terms than any competitor could negotiate. Small locally owned stores could not compete and thousands closed, creating more expansion opportunities for Blockbuster.

Blockbuster Video was a growth company with a huge following on Wall Street. Mr. Huizenga had replicated the success of Waste Management in a completely different industry. While Blockbuster was at its apex, he sold the business to Viacom. Hauling garbage is a highly needed, but largely unappreciated service. Renting movies is a service that is less important, but much more desired by the public. The same business model worked perfectly in two totally opposite areas of opportunity.

Blockbuster Video and Waste Management made Wayne Huizenga one of the most recognizable and successful entrepreneurs of the 20th century. Most people with but a small slice of this type of achievement would be completely satisfied and content. Not so with Wayne Huizenga!

Seeking another fragmented industry, where the opportunity to roll-up local and regional outlets would enable repetition of the Blockbuster Video and Waste Management successes lead Mr. Huizenga to the world of used car sales and marketing. He immediately recognized the same dysfunctional market forces, absence of scalability and pricing inefficiencies so readily apparent in the video rental and garbage hauling business.

During the 1990's auto leasing became wildly popular. These cars are leased for a set term, typically returned with average or below average miles and dealer maintained. The problem for the automobile industry was, and is, the inventory glut that occurs as leased cars are returned. This created a unique opportunity for Wayne Huizenga and his favorite business model.

He launched Auto Nation with a public sale of equity on the New York Stock Exchange. Today, Auto Nation is the largest seller of late model used cars in the world. Inventory is vast, offering virtually every popular model in great depth and variety. The scale and national reach of Auto Nation, enables pricing to be very sharp, almost always significantly lower than local dealers. In addition, all prices are negotiable and fixed, eliminating one of the major negatives to purchasing a car, haggling over price.

Three times, in three totally differing industries, Wayne Huizenga has applied a uniquely disruptive business model that has streamlined sluggish, non-dynamic business categories. He started very small. He thought very big. This is a perfect template for every prospective entrepreneur to study and utilize.

Author's Bio:

A Business Model That Keeps on Giving



Average:

Your rating: None Average: 3 (1 vote)

If there were an Entrepreneur's Hall of Fame, Wayne Huizenga would be a charter member. Most people recognize the Wayne Huizenga as being the former owner of the Florida Marlins baseball team, and the current owner of the National Football League's Miami Dolphins. These are the types of gaudy baubles a billionaire entrepreneur collects. However, his success came from the most elemental business: trash hauling.

Mr. Huizenga started as a small time cartage operator for a waste disposal firm in south Florida. He worked his way into sales and ultimately bought a small firm. In the 1960's waste disposal was a local, independent, mom and pop type of business in the United States as well as in most industrialized countries. There was no scale. Each trash removal firm worked on contracts negotiated with local governments. There was always the fear of political winds changing and effecting a contractors future status.



From his perspective as a small time operator in a highly fragmented industry, Wayne Huizenga knew that he needed a safety net, not wanting to be tied to a sole municipality for his firm's sustenance. His idea was elegantly simple: he would build a national firm, with appropriate leverage and economies of scale, by buying up key independent garbage hauling firms in strategically important markets. This would provide the strength to expand in every secondary market and standardize this formerly sclerotic industry.

This idea evolved into Waste Management. Mr. Huizenga became a billionaire when his firm, after ascending to the number one spot as an international garbage-hauling firm, with contracts spanning the United States, Europe and Asia, was listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The simple idea of consolidating hundreds of independent firms under one roof and standardizing the service menu was a thoroughly disruptive new business model. Former owners for these independent businesses were induced to sell by offers of stock, options and management contracts.

With a billion dollars in hand, Mr. Huizenga could have retired and collected art, cars, coins or stamps. He could have hung out with the idle rich. Instead, he applied the business model that created Waste Management to a completely different business category: home entertainment. In the 1970's, with the market introduction of first beat-max, and subsequently VHS technology, and then the rapid descent of retail pricing for home video players, thousands of independent retail stores popped up offering video for rent. The ability to rent a popular movie tape and play it when desired in the comfort of one's home, was a huge change in behavior and the method of delivering entertainment to the masses.

Wayne Huizenga was restless, looking for a new challenge and open to any opportunity that offered huge potential upside rewards. He saw it in a small, but growing firm: Blockbuster Video. Today, the consumer recognizes the Blockbuster brand as a generic term for home entertainment. 25 years ago, Blockbuster was one of a handful of movie rental chains, several sold franchises, all were regional, struggling for capital to fund expansion, and competing against locally owned stores. The same fragmented industry distribution channels that existed in the garbage removal business were immediately obvious to Wayne Huizenga. He pounced.

After purchasing Blockbuster Video, Mr. Huizenga began the same type of assimilation program he pursued with Waste Management. Small, local video rental chains were purchased. The Company was listed on the New York Stock Exchange and the funds raised fueled a rapid expansion. The leverage and muscle that Blockbuster gained was utilized in purchasing product from the major Hollywood studios at more favorable terms than any competitor could negotiate. Small locally owned stores could not compete and thousands closed, creating more expansion opportunities for Blockbuster.

Blockbuster Video was a growth company with a huge following on Wall Street. Mr. Huizenga had replicated the success of Waste Management in a completely different industry. While Blockbuster was at its apex, he sold the business to Viacom. Hauling garbage is a highly needed, but largely unappreciated service. Renting movies is a service that is less important, but much more desired by the public. The same business model worked perfectly in two totally opposite areas of opportunity.

Blockbuster Video and Waste Management made Wayne Huizenga one of the most recognizable and successful entrepreneurs of the 20th century. Most people with but a small slice of this type of achievement would be completely satisfied and content. Not so with Wayne Huizenga!

Seeking another fragmented industry, where the opportunity to roll-up local and regional outlets would enable repetition of the Blockbuster Video and Waste Management successes lead Mr. Huizenga to the world of used car sales and marketing. He immediately recognized the same dysfunctional market forces, absence of scalability and pricing inefficiencies so readily apparent in the video rental and garbage hauling business.

During the 1990's auto leasing became wildly popular. These cars are leased for a set term, typically returned with average or below average miles and dealer maintained. The problem for the automobile industry was, and is, the inventory glut that occurs as leased cars are returned. This created a unique opportunity for Wayne Huizenga and his favorite business model.

He launched Auto Nation with a public sale of equity on the New York Stock Exchange. Today, Auto Nation is the largest seller of late model used cars in the world. Inventory is vast, offering virtually every popular model in great depth and variety. The scale and national reach of Auto Nation, enables pricing to be very sharp, almost always significantly lower than local dealers. In addition, all prices are negotiable and fixed, eliminating one of the major negatives to purchasing a car, haggling over price.

Three times, in three totally differing industries, Wayne Huizenga has applied a uniquely disruptive business model that has streamlined sluggish, non-dynamic business categories. He started very small. He thought very big. This is a perfect template for every prospective entrepreneur to study and utilize.

Author's Bio:

Is This The Time And Energy To Call An Expert Carpet Cleaner For Cleaning Your Carpets?

No matter how careful a person is, he or she is prone to spill something on the carpet or rug sooner or later of time. The odds of this happening are even greater if your person has a young child and/or an indoor pet living in the house. But don’t panic.

Spring is upon us, and with winter, our carpets have take a toll from muddy, wet shoes tracking through the house. After your carpets have dried use a hoover to remove any hair and lint brought towards the surface of the rug due to the carpet extraction process. More often then not, the situation may actually be that previous owners were built with a dog and didn't properly maintain or clean the carpet.

It is always better to completely clean wool carpets once or two times a week. and it does have to be a 100 percent match for the enzyme to work. It's advisable to look for customer testimonials, which help you to establish a general opinion about each company. Self-Adjusting Cleaner Head

Is This The Time And Energy To Call An Expert Carpet Cleaner For Cleaning Your Carpets?

No matter how careful a person is, he or she is prone to spill something on the carpet or rug sooner or later of time. The odds of this happening are even greater if your person has a young child and/or an indoor pet living in the house. But don’t panic.

Spring is upon us, and with winter, our carpets have take a toll from muddy, wet shoes tracking through the house. After your carpets have dried use a hoover to remove any hair and lint brought towards the surface of the rug due to the carpet extraction process. More often then not, the situation may actually be that previous owners were built with a dog and didn't properly maintain or clean the carpet.

It is always better to completely clean wool carpets once or two times a week. and it does have to be a 100 percent match for the enzyme to work. It's advisable to look for customer testimonials, which help you to establish a general opinion about each company. Self-Adjusting Cleaner Head

10 HBO TV Shows You Should Watch



Created by David Milch, Deadwood is an American western television series set in the gold-mining camp by the same name in South Dakota during the 1870's.

Deadwood aired from March 21, 2004, to August 27, 2006, totaling 36 episodes over three seasons - it features an ensemble cast, many of whom appear as historical figures (Wild Bill Hickock, Calamity Jane, Wyatt Earp, George Hearst, and many more).

Timothy Olyphant (Justified, Damages) stars as Seth Bullock, a former Marshall from Montana who settles in Deadwood to establish a hardware business, along with his business partner and friend, Sol Star (John Hawkes).

The series follows Deadwood's evolution from mining camp to official town, including themes of western capitalism and the fringe-style law enforcement that is associated with the period.



As research for the show, Milch purchased a book by historian Watson Parker, Deadwood: The Golden Years, who tv production companies specialized in the history of the Black Hills. Milch and company would later purchase many of Parker's papers and books as references for the series.

Milch has repeatedly stated in interviews that his intent with the show was to study the way a civilization comes together from chaos, by organizing itself around symbols (i.e. gold), although the series visits a variety of issues, such as politics, immigration, ethnicity, prostitution, misogyny and violence.

This show is truly one of the greatest period pieces ever created, and is based in plenty of historical truths, along with its fair share of fiction. It also features one of the most beautiful opening sequences ever created. Acquire this gem as soon as you are able - you won't be disappointed.

Hiring the Best New Grads



College students all over the country are turning the tassel on their graduation caps this month and entering the job search. This can mean great things for your company, as top-notch entry-level talent is flooding the job market.

According to a study from The National Association of Colleges and Employers, employers say they will hire 2 percent more recent grads from the Class of 2013. This is down considerably from the 13 percent they predicted in the fall of 2012.

Just because the hiring forecast isn't as sunny as anticipated, however, doesn't mean you can afford to lose out on the best new diploma holders. After all, your competition will be looking to snap up the best new grads to add value to their organizations.

So here are some ways to ensure you find the best entry-level talent for your company with less time wasted and more money saved:

Personally Connect Earlier

According to the skip hire Buckinghamshire Society of Human Resource Management, 63 percent of hiring decisions are made less than five minutes into an interview. This means it's even more important to connect with candidates on a personal level earlier in the process.

A personal connection can tell you more about a candidate than what's on their resume. Since many recent grads are going to have similar credentials but vastly different skill sets, personal connection becomes even more important.

When looking at new grads, it might be time to skip the traditional resume and have candidates submit a video resume. On video, they can better explain why they're passionate about your position and the value they can bring to your company.

If you stick with the traditional paper resume, maybe you can skip the phone screen instead. Normally the middleman in the hiring process, the phone screen doesn't bring much value to your hiring but does add on tons of time. Instead, utilize one-way video interviews, where candidates can answer written questions on camera. If the candidate is all wrong for the job you can move on and focus on someone who's a better fit, without getting stuck on the phone.

Look For Company Culture Fit

There will be plenty for your new grad to learn on the job, but one skill you can't teach is how to fit into the company culture. When looking for great new grad hires who will stick around long-term, company culture alignment is one of the most important factors to consider.

In a survey of some of the most frequently asked questions by Glassdoor, many of the top queries had nothing to do with job performance and everything to do with cultural fit. So use the interview as an opportunity to find out how your new grad candidate will fit into the company mold.

During the interview, ask candidates what their five-year plan looks like. Are they just looking for a job, or are they looking for a career ladder to climb? Ask about their ideal company culture and find out what they know about your organizational environment.

Don't assume just because the candidate applied for the job that they'll fit into the office with ease. Be very clear about what the company is like in the interview and look for candidates who are already using the opportunity to ask questions about your culture. These new grads are thinking about their future and how your organization will fit into their work life.

Expectations Versus Reality

In the indie movie 500 Days of Summer, Joseph Gordon Levitt's character had great expectations of a romantic future with his ex-girlfriend, which rapidly came crashing down when he was faced with reality.

New grads have precious little real-life work experience and therefore might have some lofty expectations of what life will be like at your company. For instance, 77 percent of grads think their employer will provide career-advancing training, while the reality is only 48 percent of grads actually acquire this on-the-job education.

When talking to grads in the interview process, be clear on exactly what they can expect from your company. Outline career prospects, educational opportunities, and company perks. Pie-in-the-sky expectations can lead to new grad employee turnover, so make sure grads understand the reality before accepting your offer.

This works the other way around, as well. You might form lofty expectations of a good-on-paper candidate which just doesn't align with reality. During the hiring process, ask new grad candidates for concrete examples of experience and skills, whether it's a school project or an online work portfolio. Have candidates prove their value, so you don't have to wonder if they'll live up to expectations.

Go Fishing For Talent In Your Intern Pool

If you have an internship program, this can be a great source of new grad talent. These interns have already proven what they can do. You already know they fit into the company culture. They'll require little training, since they already know how the company works from the inside.

Best of all, interns who turn into full-time hires tend to stick around. After five years, nearly 63 percent of intern hires were still with the company, as opposed to 48 percent of outside hires. And with the cost of employee turnover, this should be enough to convince you to give your interns serious hiring consideration.

Finding the best new grad candidates isn't always easy, but it can result in your company being flooded with great new ideas and new ways of approaching old problems.

What are some ways you hire the best new grad candidates? Share in the comments!

Josh Tolan is the CEO of Spark Hire, a video powered hiring network that connects job seekers and employers through video resumes and online interviews. Connect with him and Spark Hire on Facebook and Twitter.

Follow Josh Tolan on Twitter: www.twitter.com/sparkhire



The waste left over from auto recycling deserves a closer look - Honolulu Environmental News



Automobiles in Hawaii are either recycled here or crushed and shipped to offshore recyclers. Hawaii's cars, like those elsewhere, contain valuable scrap metal and approximately 75% of the automobile by weight is salvaged and sold as scrap metal. The remaining 25%, which is called auto shredder residue (ASR) or "fluff" is discarded in the landfill.

So, what's in "fluff?" It's materials like plastic, glass, upholstery, foam and rubber. It also may contain several potentially toxic ingredients like mercury (from switches), cadmium, lead, chromium, arsenic, polyvinyl chloride, PCBs and fluids. These are all potentially hazardous materials that, over time, could leach into the groundwater or work their way to the ocean.



The material is periodically tested with a standard established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency called the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). But, of the hundreds of hazardous chemicals in use, TCLP only looks for 43. Also, it has been questioned just how vigorously even this test is applied and how much toxic material bypasses any testing.

To add insult scrap car Luton to injury, The City and County of Honolulu provides an 80% discount for recyclers to dump ASR into Oahu's landfill. A bill (Bill 47) currently before the City Council would eliminate this discount which provides large recyclers, like Schnitzer Steel with approximately $2 million in extra profit per year and seems to encourage less-than-efficient processing of the ASR. Inexplicably, the Council is also considering two new bills (36 & 37) that would restore new, albeit lower, discounts for dumping ASR.

The City Council needs to look closely at the actual materials contained in ASR before they consider any incentives for putting more of it into our landfill. They would also be wise to demand that profitable private companies actually prove they need any government "assistance," by disclosing financial information on local operations, before handing over taxpayer's money.

While everyone agrees that recycling is a good idea, our city leaders need to be more diligent in their use of tax dollars, and more aggressive in alternatives to disposal of material in our landfill that could be handed in other more environmentally friendly ways.

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